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Category: Farkles

Everything not really necessary, but nice for comfort, performance or just showing off.

Navigation towers

There are options to replace the front end of the bike with a rally oriented tower, mostly to add space for compass, log, GPS and everything you could imagine bolting to the front of the bike. Those are not cheap, but they are very versatile. And might be worth considering if you have wrecked the original front-end in a crash.

Rebel X-Sport (€2800 direct or $2950 from Rotweiller performance) replaces the whole front end, with new lights, new supports, everything. See the video to see how involved the install is.

Rebel X-Sport tower

Another vendor is MST SpecialThings (€1230), with a similar tower, Hella lights and space to put quite a lot of hardware.

MST Tower

There is also an option to beef up the existing front end: everything is hold in place by four screws and the lower metallic support. There are some (very rare!) case of the posts on the frame breaking away during a fall. TripleClampMoto developed a contraption to add more support to the whole front end ($80 on pre-order)

Replacement footpegs

There are a lot of potential replacement footpegs you can use on the 790 Adventure. Bigger, lower, moved back, in aluminium or stainless steel, the choices are multiple.

advrider inmate Kubcat collated all the lowered footpegs he could find and put them all in a spreadsheet. Which is now available for you, until we figure out how to format this in a better form. Maybe.

Lots of info on the spreadsheet.

Steering damper

The 790 adventure come standard with a simple steering damper. It’s fine, but for serious off road junkies it is not enough. There are other options out there that allow for more fine tuning (aka, dampening when going away from center, but not the other way, etc). There is a hole with a plastic plug right under the handlebar just for that purpose.

All those dampeners are going under the handlebar, this means that their mounting kits are also raising the handlebar and probably moving it forward at the same time. Keep an eye on handguard, as moving the bar forward may cause them to hit the instrument panel…

Also, if you fit one of those you need to remove the original dampener.

Scott’s damper

The most talked about, and a well proven solution on a number of bikes. With slow and high speed separate circuits, and in business since forever. $660 for the device and a mounting kit specific for the 790. The mounting kit is massive as it also adds rubber damping to the handlebar itself.

Scott’s damper with Scott’s mount

A simpler, lighter and cheaper mount is available from TripleClamp in the UK for £160, or £475 with the device.

GPR damper

Simpler solution, with only one simple button, this damper will not protect you as well against hitting a rock a speed as it lacks the high speed circuit of the Scott’s. But still, it probably does most of the job, releases when hitting a 15º angle. $525 with mounting kit.

MSC Damper

From Australia, another simple damper with one button and a mounting kit. AU$645 without shipping.

XRC damper

Chris Birch’s own, so you’ve seen this device in multiple videos already. XRC is a NewZealand company, with no web presence except for Facebook. No price, no shop, no nothing I could find. Apparently the mount on Chris’s bike is a homemade prototype, not sure if it made it into any kind of production.

Update: Someone posted pictures! Full package reported costing 1010 NZD / $635 / €575

Brake/Clutch controls

If you’re like me, brake and clutch levers are consumable. But the availability for replacements are limited (for now). KTM clutch (p/n 63502040000, €60) and brake (p/n 63513002044, €55) levers are ok, but better controls do exists.

Raximo makes short (€100/pair) and long (€120/pair) replacement levers in aluminium with a large choice of colors. I’m sure you can select more tasteful colors than the ones below:

Watch out for the Chinese knock off on ebay or other. People have ordered parts and they never shipped, and some received 790 Duke parts (they are different, the Duke has a radial master cylinder).

If you just want a shorter lever and not afraid of some DIY, garageengineer on ADVRider posted a how to to shorten the stock clutch lever.

Hacked short clutch lever

A shorter clutch lever, activated with two fingers, is harder to pull than a full sized one of course. Short or long, Camel ADV made a small little gadget making the clutch course longer and diminishing the effort at the lever. It’s called the One Finger Clutch.

Someone on facebook made another longer clutch extender, no idea of availability or cost:

Fuel cap hack

It is annoying to not being able to click the fuel cap back in place, you need to use the key to open and to close the cap. For people with a Scott Damper in place this is highly annoying as the cap is hinged forward: you need to use the key to open the cap, remove the key so it doesn’t hit the damper, open fully, fill the tank and then put the key back in the lock to close the cap.

One solution is to install the KTM screw fuel cap (P/N 63507908044), but this means the tank is no longer locked (and the cap is not attached to the bike). Or get one from a third party.

KTM screw fuel cap (P/N 63507908044)

An excellent solution is a hack that allows for closing the fuel cap by just pressing on it, no key necessary. The key is still required to open the cap, but you can remove it right away as you don’t need it to close.

First you need to take out the 2 Phillips screws to remove the cover over the latch pawl: watch out the spring and pawl will probably go flying, as they did on this pic. This can be done on the bike, but make sure you cover and protect the hole so nothing can fell in the fuel tank. An alternative is to first remove the assembly from the bike.

Removing the cover

When you have retrieved the pawl and spring, take the pawl and mark the black area, which will have to be removed to allow the pawl to move when the key is removed:

Marked area to remove

Drill, grind, file with your favorite tools (drilling first to the floor, then dremel to finish seems the easiest way to do so) until you get to this result:

Expected result

You then reassemble the lock by carefully maintaining the spring and pawl in place while you slid and screw the cover back on top.

[This is all a copy of the AdvRonski hard work on AdvRider.com. All credits to him for the idea, the realisation and the photos, all on this post. And to Braaap! who followed the instructions successfully and encouraged me to put this in the FAQ]

ABS sensor/cable protection

The rear ABS sensor, and more importantly its cable, are not well protected. A misplaced branch can snag on the cable.

Motominded makes a cover protecting the cable and the sensor. $20.

Another less protective option, that protects the sensor but not snagging of the wire, is available from a fellow on the French KTMmania forums for 3D printing (registration required, French mandatory to understand anything). STL file is send on request…

Lift

To fit a lift you need to install pools. Spools threads are M10 x 1.5 pitch (It’s called coarse metric). This is exactly the same as the 950 Adventure.

<expand with lift choices?>

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